A letter of concern has been sent to Estonian company Est-For,  signed by a number of Estonian NGOs and by the Environmental Paper Network. The letter expresses the worries about the planned Est-For pulp mill (they call it “biorefinery”), as there appear to be insufficient safeguards in place to prevent negative impacts on the environment. 

 Cocoa production in Ivory Coast and Ghana responsible for the loss of extensive forested areas, endangered chimpanzee and elephant habitat. A new report by Mighty Earth, “Chocolate’s Dark Secret,” finds that a large amount of the cocoa used in chocolate produced by Mars, Nestle, Hershey’s, Godiva, and other major chocolate companies was grown illegally in national parks and other protected areas in Ivory Coast and Ghana. The countries are the world’s two largest cocoa producers.

European Court of Justice calls Polish government for immediate suspension of logging in the Bialowieza Forest. It means that not only is Minister Szyszko’s decision from March 2016 that allowed increased timber extraction in Bialowieza Forest District suspended, but also no old, dead trees all over the forest can be cut down. The ban on felling trees necessary for preservation of forest habitats and species is in force until the European Court of Justice resolves the case of the Bialowieza Forest.

While the Polish government dispatched a massive police force to counter the peaceful protests trying to protect the old forests, the European Commission has decided to refer Poland to the Court of Justice of the EU for increased logging in the Białowieża Forest, which is a protected Natura 2000 site.As logging operations have started on a significant scale, the Commission is also requesting the Court for interim measures compelling Poland to suspend the works immediately.

The Myanmar newspaper Daily Eleven informed that the national forestry agency Myanma Timber Enterprise (MTE) has plans to resume the harvesting this year after the year-long logging moratorium. According to the media, MTE will harvest 17,000 tons in the Taninthari Region in south western Myanmar. It has been reported that trees above the minimum girth limit have already been marked for felling.